Skip to main content
Category

Uncategorized

Wise decisions with retirement in mind

By Uncategorized

Some retirees succeed at realizing the life they want; others don’t. Fate aside, it isn’t merely a matter of investment decisions that makes the difference. There are certain dos and don’ts – some less apparent than others – that tend to encourage retirement happiness and comfort.

Retire financially literate. Some retirees don’t know how much they don’t know. They end their careers with inadequate financial knowledge, and yet, feel they can prepare for retirement on their own. They mistake creating a retirement income strategy with the whole of preparing for retirement, and gloss over longevity risk, risks to their estate, and potential health care expenses. The more you know, the more your retirement readiness improves.

A goal to retire debt free – or close to debt free?  Even if your retirement savings are substantial, you may want to consider reviewing your overall debt situation.1

Retire with purpose. There’s a difference between retiring and quitting. Some people can’t wait to quit their job at 62 or 65.  If only they could escape and just relax and do nothing for a few years – wouldn’t that be a nice reward? Relaxation can lead to inertia, however – and inertia can lead to restlessness, even depression. You want to retire to a dream, not away from a problem.

The bottom line? Retirees who know what they want to do – and go out and do it – are positively contributing to their mental health and possibly their physical health as well. If they do something that is not only vital to them, but important to others, their community can benefit as well.

Retire healthy. Smoking, drinking, overeating, a dearth of physical activity – all these can take a toll on your capacity to live life fully and enjoy retirement. It is never too late to change habits that may lead to poor health. 

Retire where you feel at home. It could be where you live now; it could be a nearby place where the scenery and people are uplifting. If you find yourself lonely in retirement, then look for ways to connect with people who share your experiences, interests, and passions; those who encourage you and welcome you. This social interaction is one of the great, intangible retirement benefits.

……….

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Investment advice offered through American Wealth Management (“AWM”), a SEC-registered investment adviser. Certain personnel of AWM may also be registered representatives of M.S. Howells & Co. (“MSH”), Member FINRA/SIPC, a registered broker-dealer, and therefore, may offer securities through MSH. AWM and MSH are not affiliated entities.

Citations

  1. CNBC.com, December 2, 2020

2022 Annual Financial To-do List

By Uncategorized

What financial, business, or life priorities do you need to address for the coming year? Now is an excellent time to think about the investing, saving, or budgeting methods you could employ toward specific objectives, from building your retirement fund to managing your taxes. You have plenty of choices. Here are a few ideas to consider:

Can you contribute more to your retirement plans this year? In 2022, the contribution limit for a Roth or traditional individual retirement account (IRA) is expected to remain at $6,000 ($7,000 for those making “catch-up” contributions). Your modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) may affect how much you can put into a Roth IRA. With a traditional IRA, you can contribute if you (or your spouse if filing jointly) have taxable compensation, but income limits are one factor in determining whether the contribution is tax-deductible.1

Keep in mind, this article is for informational purposes only and not a replacement for real-life advice. Also, tax rules are constantly changing, and there is no guarantee that the tax landscape will remain the same in years ahead.

Once you reach age 72, you must begin taking required minimum distributions from a traditional Individual Retirement Account in most circumstances. Withdrawals from Traditional IRAs are taxed as ordinary income and, if taken before age 59½, may be subject to a 10% federal income tax penalty.

To qualify for the tax-free and penalty-free withdrawal of earnings, Roth 401(k) distributions must meet a five-year holding requirement and occur after age 59½. Tax-free and penalty-free withdrawal can also be taken under certain other circumstances, such as the owner’s death. Employer match is pretax and not distributed tax-free during retirement.

Make a charitable gift. You can claim the deduction on your tax return, provided you follow the Internal Review Service guidelines and itemize your deductions with Schedule A. The paper trail can be important here. If you give cash, you should consider documenting it. Some contributions can be demonstrated by a bank record, payroll deduction record, credit card statement, or written communication from the charity with the date and amount. Incidentally, the IRS does not equate a pledge with a donation. If you pledge $2,000 to a charity this year but only end up gifting $500, you can only deduct $500.2

Make certain to consult your tax, legal, or accounting professional before modifying your record-keeping approach or your strategy for making charitable gifts.

See if you can take a home office deduction for your small business. If you are a small-business owner, you may want to investigate this. You may be able to write off expenses linked to the portion of your home used to conduct your business. Using your home office as a business expense involves a complex set of tax rules and regulations. Before moving forward, consider working with a professional who is familiar with the tax rules as they relate to home-based businesses.3

Open an HSA. A Health Savings Account (HSA) works a bit like your workplace retirement account. There are also some HSA rules and limitations to consider. You are limited to a $3,650 contribution for 2022 if you are single; $7,300 if you have a spouse or family. Those limits jump by a $1,000 “catch-up” limit for each person in the household over age 55.4

If you spend your HSA funds for non-medical expenses before age 65, you may be required to pay ordinary income tax as well as a 20% penalty. After age 65, you may be required to pay ordinary income taxes on HSA funds used for nonmedical expenses. HSA contributions are exempt from federal income tax; however, they are not exempt from state taxes in certain states.

Pay attention to asset location. Tax-efficient asset location is one factor that can be considered when creating an investment strategy.

Review your withholding status. Should it be adjusted due to any of the following factors?

  • You tend to pay the federal or state government at the end of each year.
  • You tend to get a federal tax refund each year.
  • You recently married or divorced.
  • You have a new job, and your earnings have been adjusted.

Consider consulting your tax, human resources, or accounting professional before modifying your withholding status.

Did you get married in 2021? If so, it may be an excellent time to review the beneficiaries of your retirement accounts and other assets. The same goes for your insurance coverage. If you are preparing to have a new last name in 2022, you may want to get a new Social Security card. Additionally, retirement accounts may need to be revised or adjusted?

Are you coming home from active duty? If so, go ahead and check on the status of your credit and any tax and legal proceedings that might have been preempted by your orders.

Consider the tax impact of any upcoming transactions. Are you preparing to sell any real estate this year? Are you starting a business? Might any commissions or bonuses come your way in 2022? Do you anticipate selling an investment that is held outside of a tax-deferred account?

If you are retired and in your seventies, remember your RMDs. In other words, Required Minimum Distributions (RMDs) from retirement accounts. In most circumstances, once you reach age 72, you must begin taking RMDs from most types of these accounts.5       

Vow to focus on your overall health and practice sound financial habits in 2022. And don’t be afraid to ask for help from professionals who understand your individual situation.

……….

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Investment advice offered through American Wealth Management (“AWM”), a SEC-registered investment adviser. Certain personnel of AWM may also be registered representatives of M.S. Howells & Co. (“MSH”), Member FINRA/SIPC, a registered broker-dealer, and therefore, may offer securities through MSH. AWM and MSH are not affiliated entities.

Citations

  1. thefinancebuff.com, August 11, 2021
  2. irs.gov, January 22, 2021
  3. nerdwallet.com, July 31, 2020
  4. irs.gov, September 8, 2021
  5. irs.gov, May 3, 2021

 

The Underutilized Benefits of a Health Savings Account

By Uncategorized

Healthcare can be one of the priciest yet essential parts of life’s journey. And yet, many struggle to utilize the financial tools that may help. Take Health Saving Accounts (HSAs), for example.

In 2019, 55% of those with HSAs that did not record a distribution also did not receive either employee or employer contributions. This suggests that the lack of distributions are due to account holders becoming disengaged from their accounts, rather than not having access to this cost-saving financial tool.1

And yet, for those looking to help manage the financial impact of healthcare, a Health Savings Account (HSA) may be just the ticket.

HSA Tax Benefits. A large draw for many are the tax benefits inherent to HSAs:

  • Contributions through an employer are always pretax
  • You can invest the funds after your account balance reaches a certain level
  • Distributions for qualified health expenses aren’t taxable

Additionally, unlike a Flexible Spending Account (FSA), which is funded with pretax dollars but must be used by a specific deadline, HSA contributions can remain in your account to be used for future medical bills at any time. In short, this means there is no “use it or lose it” penalty.2

Keep in mind that if you spend your HSA funds for non-qualified expenses before age 65, you may be required to pay ordinary income tax as well as a 20% penalty. After age 65, you may be required to pay ordinary income taxes on HSA funds used for non-qualified expenses. HSA contributions are exempt from federal income tax; however, they are not exempt from state taxes in certain states.

HSA Contribution Limits for 2022. HSA contribution limits are adjusted annually for inflation. For 2022, the self-only contribution limit is $3,650 or $7,300 for families. This is a $50 increase for individuals and a $100 increase for families from 2021. The contribution limit refers to contributions from both employers and employees (or family members).

These adjustments are rounded to the nearest $50 to account for inflation rates, which are determined using the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers.3

How to use your HSA. The IRS or your HSA provider are great sources when getting started. For example, the IRS recently issued a reminder that at-home covid tests, face masks, and sanitizing wipes can all be purchased, or qualify for reimbursement, through an HSA. In addition, the IRS offers an interactive assessment tool that can take the guesswork out of what qualifies as an HSA-friendly expense.4

……………

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Investment advice offered through American Wealth Management (“AWM”), a SEC-registered investment adviser. Certain personnel of AWM may also be registered representatives of M.S. Howells & Co. (“MSH”), Member FINRA/SIPC, a registered broker-dealer, and therefore, may offer securities through MSH. AWM and MSH are not affiliated entities.

Citations

1. EBRI.org, January 21, 2021
2. Marketwatch.com, March 17, 2021
3. IRS.gov, May 2021
4. IRS.gov, September 10, 2021

Direct Indexing: An old portfolio method that’s getting new attention

By Uncategorized

“Indexing” is a familiar phrase in investment jargon, and a familiar concept. Money managers structure certain investment vehicles to contain all of the stocks within a particular Wall Street index, such as the Standard & Poor’s 500 stock index. This equity exposure may fit the investment strategy for some investors depending on their risk tolerance, time horizon and goals.

“Direct indexing” is a variation on this idea. The goals are the same: to match the performance of an index. The methodology differs, however. Instead of buying one investment designed to mirror the composition of an index, the investor buys shares of each stock within the index.

Why would an investor go to such lengths? To start, the pursuit of tax efficiency. Direct indexing can also lead to a more customized portfolio, giving an investor more ability to add and subtract companies that do or do not align with that investor’s values or market objectives.1

This article is for informational purposes only. It’s not a replacement for real-life advice, so make sure to consult your tax or accounting professionals before modifying your tax strategy if you are considering direct indexing. 

Technological advances have put direct indexing within reach of more investors today. Years ago, it was largely the domain of hands-on types with considerable assets in their portfolios. Now, there are firms that can help with this approach.

Direct indexing can encourage more trades. A hands-on investor closely scrutinizing performance may want to consider a direct indexing strategy, especially when the equities market turns turbulent. But that can lead to more fees, which may offset the potential benefits of the approach.2

This article is strictly an explanation of the basics of direct indexing, and not an endorsement or recommendation of the strategy. If direct indexing interests you, feel free to explore the approach by consulting a professional before attempting it.

Investing involves risk, including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. The S&P 500 Composite Index is an unmanaged index that is considered representative of the overall U.S. stock market. Opinions expressed are subject to change without notice and are not intended as investment advice or to predict future performance. Past performance does not guarantee future results. Consult your financial professional before making any investment decision. This information is designed to provide general information on the subjects covered. It is not, however, intended to provide specific legal or tax advice and cannot be used to avoid tax penalties or to promote, market, or recommend any tax plan or arrangement.

……..

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Investment advice offered through American Wealth Management (“AWM”), a SEC-registered investment adviser. Certain personnel of AWM may also be registered representatives of M.S. Howells & Co. (“MSH”), Member FINRA/SIPC, a registered broker-dealer, and therefore, may offer securities through MSH. AWM and MSH are not affiliated entities.

Citations

1. Forbes, April 15, 2021
2. Bloomberg, January 9, 2020

How U.S. Savings Bonds Work

By Uncategorized

Did you buy U.S. Savings Bonds decades ago? Or did your parents or grandparents purchase them for you? If they’re collecting dust in a drawer, you may want to take a look at them to see if any of your bonds have matured. If your bonds have matured, that means they are no longer earning interest, and it also means you may want to consider cashing them in.1

This article is for informational purposes only. It’s not a replacement for real-life advice, so make sure to consult your tax professional when you’re considering any move with a U.S. Savings Bond.

You want to keep track of the maturity dates, the yields and the interest rates on your bonds, as that will help you to figure out what bond to redeem when. Fortunately, you’re able to check the maturity dates online now so it’s relatively easy to determine if it’s time to cash-in your bonds.2

Use savings bonds for educational purposes. If you’ve been holding onto Series EE or Series I savings bonds, the interest paid is tax-exempt, so long as the money is used to pay for qualified educational expenses. There are other considerations, so if you discover you have these types of bonds to cash in a tax professional may be able to provide some guidance.3

Interest accumulated over the life of a U.S. Savings Bond must be reported on your 1040 form for the tax year in which you redeem the bond or it reaches final maturity. This must be done even if you (or the original bondholder) chose to have the interest on the bond accumulate tax-deferred until the final maturity date. Failure to report such interest may lead to a federal tax penalty.2

Remember, U.S. Savings Bonds are guaranteed by the federal government as to the payment of principal and interest. However, if you sell a savings bond prior to maturity, it could be worth more or less than the original price paid.

U.S. Savings Bonds are taxed in one of two ways. Bondholders choose to defer the tax until the bond matures. Once they redeem the bond, they report the interest through a 1099-INT form. Some choose to pay the tax annually prior to cashing the bond in, reporting the increase in the value of the bond as taxable interest each year.2,3

What if you find out you have held a U.S. Savings Bond for too long? Another note about reporting interest: if a U.S. Savings Bond has matured and you have failed to redeem it, you will not find a Form 1099-INT for it in your records. Only redemption will bring that 1099-INT your way. (The accumulated interest for the bond should have been reported to the IRS regardless.) After you cash in that old bond, you will thereafter receive a 1099-INT. It will record that the interest on the bond was earned in the year of the bond’s final maturity.2

Plan ahead & keep track. U.S. Savings Bonds were issued on paper for decades and were often purchased on behalf of children and grandchildren. Now, U.S. Savings Bonds are issued electronically. While the interest on U.S. Savings Bonds is taxed by the IRS, it is exempt from state and local taxes.1,2

……….

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Investment advice offered through American Wealth Management (“AWM”), a SEC-registered investment adviser. Certain personnel of AWM may also be registered representatives of M.S. Howells & Co. (“MSH”), Member FINRA/SIPC, a registered broker-dealer, and therefore, may offer securities through MSH. AWM and MSH are not affiliated entities.

Citations

  1. TreasuryDirect.gov, August 2, 2021
  2. IRS.gov, April 1, 2021
  3. BusinessInsider.com, Feb 12, 2021

What you need to do know about the updated Child Tax Credit

By Uncategorized

The federal government has upgraded its Child Tax Credit. Thanks to the American Rescue Plan Act, there are four notable differences in effect for the 2021 tax year only.1

First, the Internal Revenue Service is paying many families who qualify for the CTC 50% of their credit before 2021 ends. Second, the credit has grown larger for most eligible families: $3,000 per child, $3,600 per child under age 6. Third, this year’s CTC is fully refundable. Fourth, the credit has been extended to 17-year-olds for the first time – that is, children who turn 17 in 2021.1,2

Remember, this article is for informational purposes only. It’s not a replacement for real-life advice, so make sure to consult your tax or legal professionals if you have any questions about the CTC or how it operates. 

All this comes with a caveat. Some families may end up getting a bigger CTC than they should, and they may have to pay some of it back. Certain households may see their adjusted gross incomes (AGIs) rise for 2021, to the point where they may be eligible for less of the CTC than the I.R.S. has paid out to them.2

CTC payments are going out in monthly increments through December. Eligible families are receiving $250 a month for each child aged 6-17 and $300 a month for each child under age 6. A small number of CTC recipients are opting for a lump-sum payment that the I.R.S. will send them in 2022, after they file their 2021 federal tax returns.2

High-income families might get less. Phase-outs apply for this year’s expanded per-child credits of $3,000/$3,600. As a result, affluent households might only receive the standard $2,000-per-child credit in six monthly increments rather than the enlarged one.2

Phase-outs will kick in for single filers with modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) greater than $75,000, heads of household with MAGI greater than $112,500 and joint filers and widows/widowers with MAGI greater than $150,000. For each $1,000 (or fraction thereof) that the taxpayer’s MAGI exceeds the applicable threshold, the taxpayer’s CTC is reduced by $50.3

Some divorced parents have opted for the lump-sum payment in 2022. Here, the risk of taking the monthly payments is that if one parent claimed a child in 2020 but doesn’t in 2021, they may get CTC credits in 2021 that they have to pay back in 2022.2

Keep in mind that tax rules are constantly changing, and there is no guarantee that any of these CTC changes will be carried over into future tax years. If you have any questions, please reach out. We may have some resources that can help answer some of your questions.

……….

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Investment advice offered through American Wealth Management (“AWM”), a SEC-registered investment adviser. Certain personnel of AWM may also be registered representatives of M.S. Howells & Co. (“MSH”), Member FINRA/SIPC, a registered broker-dealer, and therefore, may offer securities through MSH. AWM and MSH are not affiliated entities.

Citations

  1. Kiplinger.com, July 14, 2021
  2. CNBC, June 30, 2021
  3. Internal Revenue Service, July 30, 2021

 

FAFSA Simplification Act

By Uncategorized

Learn about how legislative changes can help you finance your loved one’s education.

As a parent or grandparent, you know firsthand the challenges of funding a child’s education. The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) Act was passed at the end of 2020 and has changed some of the qualifications for students to receive financial aid.

These changes will affect those applying for financial aid for the 2023-2024 school year. You’ll notice these changes on October 1, 2022, which is when the FAFSA opens for the 2023-2024 school year.

529 plans from grandparents are no longer counted as cash against financial aid. One of the most confusing parts of the FAFSA process was how to account for cash funding. While the FAFSA doesn’t require 529 accounts owned by grandparents to be disclosed, families are required to disclose cash support that the student receives. This cash support may then include money from a 529 account. If students received money from these accounts, the student was still expected to disclose these disbursements as cash, and very often, financial aid needs and options were reduced.1

Parent-owned 529 plans are automatically factored into the FAFSA when a dependent files, and are only evaluated for up to 5.64% available for college use (no more than any other non-qualified asset).

A 529 plan is a college savings plan that allows individuals to save for college on a tax-advantaged basis. State tax treatment of 529 plans is only one factor to consider prior to committing to a savings plan. Also, consider the fees and expenses associated with the particular plan. Whether a state tax deduction is available will depend on your state of residence. State tax laws and treatment may vary. State tax laws may be different from federal tax laws. Earnings on non-qualified distributions will be subject to income tax and a 10% federal penalty tax.

A simplified questionnaire. The FAFSA has been greatly reduced in size, from 108 demographic, educational, and identification questions to a maximum of 36 questions. Part of the restructuring was aimed at clearing up confusion as to who is and is not a dependent student, and what type of assets need to be included.2,3

Student Aid Indicator (SAI) calculation changes. Part of the questionnaire changes were due to changes made to the calculations for financial aid. The Student Aid Indicator (SAI) is the math behind the scenes that determines what types of funding and how much a student is eligible for. Keep in mind that these calculations are still complicated, but that overall, eligibility for financial aid has been broadened.4

……….

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Investment advice offered through American Wealth Management (“AWM”), a SEC-registered investment adviser. Certain personnel of AWM may also be registered representatives of M.S. Howells & Co. (“MSH”), Member FINRA/SIPC, a registered broker-dealer, and therefore, may offer securities through MSH. AWM and MSH are not affiliated entities.

Citations

  1. ColumbiaThreadneedleUS.com, May 7, 2021
  2. Help.Senate.gov, 2021
  3. NerdWallet.com, January 25, 2021
  4. AACRAO.org, April 16, 2021

Insurance When You Marry After 40

By Uncategorized

With people marrying later in life these days, coverage has become even more important.

 

When you marry, you buy life insurance. Right? You buy it out of consideration for your spouse, and also realize that in the event of either your untimely death or your spouse’s untimely death, your household could be left with one income to shoulder expenses that may not lessen.

These days, people are marrying later in life. Take first marriages, for example. A recent study by the Pew Research Center says the median age for marriage in America is now 30 for men and 28 for women, compared to respective median ages of 23 and 21 in 1968. Today, 16% of us are waiting until at least our late forties to marry.1,2

Maybe you are marrying after age forty, or thinking about it. That might call for other insurance considerations besides having life insurance policy. Whether you are marrying for the first time or the second, third, or fourth time, your earnings and net worth may be much greater than they were ten, twenty, or thirty years ago, and you also may have some age-linked or business-linked insurance priorities.

These are worth discussing on your way to marrying. Are you and your spouse set to run a business or professional practice? Is there a significant occurrence of dementia in your family history, or your spouse’s family history? How about a particular, severe illness? These questions may seem tough to mull over as you approach the big day, but being pragmatic now might be wise for the years ahead.

Some of us will live very long lives, and possibly need assisted living someday. Marrying at mid-life or later means giving serious thought not just to life insurance, but also to ways to insure extended care. The Social Security Administration projects that today, the average 65-year-old man will probably live to age 83; the average 65-year-old woman will probably live to age 85. Advances in health care may mean even longer lifespans for those who turn 65 ten or twenty years from now. A percentage of us may be so “above average” that we live past 100, and that percentage may grow with scientific breakthroughs.3

Extended care coverage, or coverage that offers the potential to keep a household can be important in the marriage. It may be smart to have a life insurance trust created for the benefit of one spouse, or have one spouse own a particular policy.

Using a life insurance trust involves a complex set of tax rules and regulations. Before moving forward with a life insurance trust, consider working with a professional who is familiar with the rules and regulations.

Several factors will affect the cost and availability of life insurance, including age, health, and the type and amount of insurance purchased. Life insurance policies have expenses, including mortality and other charges. If a policy is surrendered prematurely, the policyholder also may pay surrender charges and have income tax implications. You should consider determining whether you are insurable before implementing a strategy involving life insurance. Any guarantees associated with a policy are dependent on the ability of the issuing insurance company to continue making claim payments.

Now is not too soon to think about these matters. Looking into these different insurance coverages could be a very kind thing to do for your future spouse, yourself, and your marriage.

……….

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Investment advice offered through American Wealth Management (“AWM”), a SEC-registered investment adviser. Certain personnel of AWM may also be registered representatives of M.S. Howells & Co. (“MSH”), Member FINRA/SIPC, a registered broker-dealer, and therefore, may offer securities through MSH. AWM and MSH are not affiliated entities.

Citations

1. Pew Research Center, May 27, 2020
2. Good Morning America, May 24, 2021
3. NerdWallet, November 6, 2020

2021 Retirement Confidence Survey: Workers’ expectations in retirement vs. actual income

By Uncategorized

Will your retirement dreams match your reality?

That’s perhaps the most critical question to ask people who are currently retired. Was your retirement what you expected, or was it something else?

For more than 30 years, the Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI) has conducted the Retirement Confidence Survey, which gauges the views and attitudes of working-age and retired Americans regarding retirement and their preparations for retirement.1

Part of the survey takes a deep dive into workers’ expectations for sources of income in retirement versus retirees’ actual income sources.

Here’s a couple of highlights of the 2021 survey.

Only 33% of workers expect Social Security to be a significant source of retirement income. In reality, 62% of retirees say it’s a major source.

Further, more than 50% of workers believe that workplace retirement savings plans will be a significant source of retirement income. But the 2021 survey found that workplace plans are a major source for only 20% of retirees.

Surprised? We’re not. These numbers are consistent year after year. Here’s another nugget to consider: 26% of workers plan to work for pay in retirement. In reality, only 7% of retirees do.

For most, retirement is the “next chapter” in life. It’s critical that your finances support your retirement vision, so there are no surprises when it’s your turn.

Let us know if there’s a change in your retirement dream. We’d welcome the chance to hear what prompted the difference, and we’ll be sure to make any needed adjustments in your financial strategy.

……….

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Investment advice offered through American Wealth Management (“AWM”), a SEC-registered investment adviser. Certain personnel of AWM may also be registered representatives of M.S. Howells & Co. (“MSH”), Member FINRA/SIPC, a registered broker-dealer, and therefore, may offer securities through MSH. AWM and MSH are not affiliated entities.

Citations

1. Employee Benefit Research Institute, 2021 Retirement Confidence Survey

Cybersecurity: Protecting Yourself From Potential Calamity

By Uncategorized

Cybercrime affects both large corporations and private individuals. You’ve likely read about the large data breaches in the business world. These crimes are both expensive and on the rise. The U.S. Identity Theft Resource Center says that these corporate data breaches reached a peak of 1,632 in 2017. The response to the growing need for data protection has been swift and powerful; venture capitalists have invested $5.3 billion into cybersecurity firms.1

That’s good news for the big companies, but what about for the individual at home? What can you do to protect data breaches to your personal accounts?

For most private individuals, the key idea is to both:

  • Know what to do if you’ve had a data breach.
  • Know what you can do that might help prevent a data breach.

Total cybersecurity for your financial matters isn’t something that can be strategized in a single short article like this one, but we would like to offer you two suggestions that can help you get started. Both can be done from home and represent reactive and preventative measures.

Credit Freeze. By reactive, we mean that a step that you can take after the fact. In many cases, a credit freeze might be a reaction to identity theft or a data breach. What it specifically does is restrict access to your credit report, which has information that could be used to open new lines of credit in your name. The freeze prevents this, but it will not prevent a criminal from, for instance, using an active credit card number, if they’ve discovered it. For that reason, you still have to monitor for unauthorized transactions during the freeze.2

While the freeze is in place, you can still get your free annual credit report. You also won’t have issues with credit background searches for job or renter’s applications or when you buy insurance – the freeze doesn’t affect those areas of your credit history. You can even apply for a new line of credit during a credit freeze, though that requires a temporary or permanent elimination of the freeze during the process. This can be done through either a call to the big three credit reporting agencies (Equifax, Experian, and Transunion) or a visit to their respective websites.2

Password Manager. This is a preventative measure. Yes, we all know the poor soul who uses “Password” as their password. While you are probably not that far gone, the truth is that there are many tricks that cybercrooks use to learn or intuit our passwords. In fact, 20% of Internet consumers have experienced some sort of account compromise. That comes at a time when about 70% of consumers operate 10 or more accounts. A few, against best practice, will use the same password across each of those accounts. A good security measure against that is password manager software – applications that allow us to keep all our numerous passwords encrypted in a vault and drop them into our browsers when requested. While yes, there are options to save these passwords, encrypted on most browsers, these security measures are limited. Password managers are focused solely on security and are more frequently updated than the browser security features might be. That attention might be difference between a criminal obtaining access to your sensitive personal information or being blocked in the attempt.3,4

While this is a very basic pair of tips, they are worth thinking about and may prove to be helpful in your efforts to prevent identity theft. There are, however, additional, more-advanced choices for you to explore. Talk with your trusted financial professional about other cybersecurity best practices that you might consider.

……….

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Investment advice offered through American Wealth Management (“AWM”), a SEC-registered investment adviser. Certain personnel of AWM may also be registered representatives of M.S. Howells & Co. (“MSH”), Member FINRA/SIPC, a registered broker-dealer, and therefore, may offer securities through MSH. AWM and MSH are not affiliated entities.

Citations

1. forbes.com/sites/forbestechcouncil/2019/10/09/the-need-for-a-breakthrough-in-cybersecurity/ [10/9/19] 2. consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0497-credit-freeze-faqs [9/2019] 3. wired.com/story/best-password-managers/ [9/25/19] 4. digitalguardian.com/blog/uncovering-password-habits-are-users-password-security-habits-improving-infographic [12/18/18]